Memorial for Levi and Edwin Benedict.

 

The bench-shaped marker is part of the Cottingham family plot.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This celtic cross marks the grave of Frederick A. Sterling, born in Salisbury, Connecticut in 1796, died in Cleveland 1853.

 

 

Morris family plot.

 

Below, the memorial for Henry George Dalton  (1862-1939), his wife and 2 young children.  He was a leading business man and philanthropist who helped establish the Cleveland Orchestra & Cleveland Museum of Art

 

 

 

 

These unique, coffin-shaped sculptures mark the graves of William S. Wetmore, who died on July 21, 1898, and his wife, Annie, who later passed in 1918.

 

 

This matching pair of crosses mark the graves of John Vickers Painter (1835-1903) and his wife, Lydia Ethel F. Painter (1842-1909).  On the back of each cross are long inscriptions.  John's inscription reads:

“there is no calm like that when the storm is done;
there is no pleasure keen as pain’s release;
there is no joy that lies so deep as peace,
no peace so deep as that by struggle won”

Lydia's inscription reads:

“from world to world, the soul’s wings never furled,
today our world is filled with angels in their flight,
and if unrecognized they pass beyond our sight
by what law dare we name the time
when we shall know again such love sublime?"
What matter
Whether face to face we meet in other world
If here we’ve recognized and kept souls’ wings unfurled.”

 

These elegantly simple slabs mark the graves of Edward Paysor Hunt (1838-1923) and Mary Rice Hunt (1844-1931).

 

Sidney Guy Sea of Chicago (1856-1895)

 His inscription reads:

“Secure I turn to rest and sleep”

 

Steinbrenner memorial.  The anchor is a common cemetery symbol of faith and hope; a love of sailing; or a designation of the deceased as a shipping businessman.

 

Rufus P. Ranney (1813-1891), former Ohio Supreme Court Justice and the Ohio State Bar Association's first president.

 

A small, but interesting marker for child Nathaniel C. Cozad, who died in 1836 at the age of 5.  The date of his death was over 30 years before Lake View Cemetery was established.  Presumably, as was common after the cemetery opened, his family reburied him here.

 

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